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dictionnaire:the_morphology_of_classical_latin2 [2015/10/24 11:56]
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dictionnaire:the_morphology_of_classical_latin2 [2016/01/27 17:56] (Version actuelle)
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-p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p.MsoFootnoteText, li.MsoFootnoteText, div.MsoFootnoteText { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }span.MsoFootnoteReference { vertical-align: super; }span.NotedebasdepageCar {  }span.traduction2 {  }.MsoChpDefault { font-size: 10pt; }div.WordSection1 { page: WordSection1; }. <html><p class="lestitres"> The morphology of classical Latin </p></html>\\  \\  \\  ----\\  \\  \\  ====== 2. ** +<html><p class="lestitres"> The morphology of classical Latin </p></html>
-Concepts of morphology +
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 +====== 2. Concepts of morphology ======  
  
-If the minimal linguistic unit is really the morpheme, //i.e//. the minimal meaningful unit, or the minimal unit which has both contents and an expression, a signified and a signifier, as linguists say, the minimal analysis unit is actually for the linguist what we call the  
  
  
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 +If the minimal linguistic unit is really the morpheme, //i.e//. the minimal meaningful unit, or the minimal unit which has both contents and an expression, a signified and a signifier, as linguists say, the minimal analysis unit is actually for the linguist what we call the 
 **morphological unit**, //i.e//. the class of the morphological segments, //i.e.// phonological segments which are independent from the environment. And these morphological units, alone or in combination, are used by the Latin language to form the signifier of its morphemes.  **morphological unit**, //i.e//. the class of the morphological segments, //i.e.// phonological segments which are independent from the environment. And these morphological units, alone or in combination, are used by the Latin language to form the signifier of its morphemes. 
  
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-The linguists try to classify the different allomorphs shown by a morpheme, and for that, they consider as the **basis form** the unmotivated form, which is then called unmarked form (or the primary form, according J. Kuryłowicz[[+The linguists try to classify the different allomorphs shown by a morpheme, and for that, they consider as the **basis form** the unmotivated form, which is then called unmarked form (or the primary form, according J. Kuryłowicz((Kuryłowiz, Jerzy, 1949, "Le problème du classement des cas", in ://Biuletyn Polskiego Towarystwa Jezykoznawczego//, 9, 20-26-43.))). So, the signified “great” corresponds in Latin to three morphs //magn-, mag-// and //maj-//; //maj-// appears only in context of the comparative morpheme -//ior-// (//maior // “great-er”)//, // and //mag- // before the superlative morpheme -//sim-// (//maximus// “very great” or “the greatest”). Therefore //magn-us // is the basis form of this morpheme, since it appears in other contexts than these particular contexts. It is likely that /maj/ is not a phonological variant, but a morphological variant from /mag/ before /i/, and therefore it would be doubly motivated. As for the allomorph /mag/, it is phonetically realized like [mak] in //maximus//, because the phonological neutralization of voiced phonemes before an unvoiced /s/ or /t/. That can be technically formulated by the three following morphological rules:
  
  
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-]] ). So, the signified “great” corresponds in Latin to three morphs //magn-, mag-// and //maj-//; //maj-// appears only in context of the comparative morpheme -//ior-// (//maior // “great-er”)//, // and //mag// before the superlative morpheme -//sim-// (//maximus// “very great” or “the greatest”). Therefore //magn-us // is the basis form of this morpheme, since it appears in other contexts than these particular contexts. It is likely that /maj/ is not a phonological variant, but a morphological variant from /mag/ before /i/, and therefore it would be doubly motivated. As for the allomorph /mag/, it is phonetically realized like [mak] in //maximus//, because the phonological neutralization of voiced phonemes before an unvoiced /s/ or /t/. That can be technically formulated by the three following morphological rules:+^    |  |mai/ / ─  [i] Comparative | 
 +^     |  great  →  |/mag/ / ─ Superlative| 
 +^    |    |/magn/
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-/mai/ **/** ─  
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-[i] Comparative 
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-{great} 
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-/mag/ **/** ─ Superlative 
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-/magn/ 
  
  
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-Kuryłowiz, Jerzy, 1949, "Le problème du classement des cas", in ://Biuletyn Polskiego Towarystwa Jezykoznawczego//, 9, 20-26-43.+ 
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 +[[:encyclopédie_linguistique:notions_linguistiques:morphologie:The morphology_of_classical Latin|Retour au plan]] ou  
 +[[:dictionnaire: The morphology of classical latin3|Aller au § 3.]]