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dictionnaire:the_morphology_of_classical_latin1 [2016/01/27 15:45]
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dictionnaire:the_morphology_of_classical_latin1 [2016/01/27 17:48] (Version actuelle)
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-    * Bloomfield p. 207((Cf. Touratier, « Système des consonnes », 2005, 118-119. Alvarez Heurta, « Neutralisation consonantique en latin », 2005, 146-147, Language, London, George Allen & Unwin, 566 p.))//We may say that morphology includes the constructions of words and parts of words, while syntax includes the constructions of phrases.// +    * Bloomfield p. 207((Cf. Touratier, 2005, « Système des consonnes »,p.118-119. Alvarez Heurta, 2005, « Neutralisation consonantique en latin », p.146-147, //Language//, London, George Allen & Unwin, 566 p.))//We may say that morphology includes the constructions of words and parts of words, while syntax includes the constructions of phrases.// 
  
  
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-**Eugene Nida’s point of view**   : Nida((E.Nida, //The Descriptive Analysis of Words//))  defines morphology as+**Eugene Nida’s point of view**   : Nida((E.Nida, 1965, //Morphology. The Descriptive Analysis of Words//,  University of Michigan Press.))  defines morphology as
  
  
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-    * Peter H. Matthews, 2003<sup><sup>((7)))</sup>)</sup>, vol. 3, p. 81: //In some treatments of morphology, words are analyzed into basics units called morphemes, and the process is called morphemic//.+    * Peter H. Matthews((H. Mattheews, 2003<sup>2</sup>, article Morpheme in the //International Encyclopedia of Linguistics//, vol. 3,)), p. 81: //In some treatments of morphology, words are analyzed into basics units called morphemes, and the process is called morphemic//.
  
  
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 If we examine the things more accurately, the difference is not so great between these morphological units and the signifier of morphemes, because the signifiers of morpheme can become any simple part of a signifier, as in the compound words that Danièle Corbin calls “complex words no constructed”, like fr. //carpette//, which doesn’t correspond to “little carp“, but means “rug”, or //chaise//-//longue//   “deck chair” and //chaise//   //électrique//   “ electric chair”, which are not strictly speaking chairs. These compound words are simple morphemes the meaning of which is independent from the meaning of the morphological segments that constitute it. If we examine the things more accurately, the difference is not so great between these morphological units and the signifier of morphemes, because the signifiers of morpheme can become any simple part of a signifier, as in the compound words that Danièle Corbin calls “complex words no constructed”, like fr. //carpette//, which doesn’t correspond to “little carp“, but means “rug”, or //chaise//-//longue//   “deck chair” and //chaise//   //électrique//   “ electric chair”, which are not strictly speaking chairs. These compound words are simple morphemes the meaning of which is independent from the meaning of the morphological segments that constitute it.
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